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1800 - 1900

1800 - 1900

1767 - 1828: Jean-Baptiste Pouplin (BE)

1767 - 1828: Jean-Baptiste Pouplin (BE)

Jean-Baptiste Pouplin was a Belgian teacher of French origin. He was the founder of one of the first schools for deaf students on the European continent, in Liège in 1819.

1776 - 1839: Pär Aron Borg (SE)

1776 - 1839: Pär Aron Borg (SE)

In 1809, Pär Aron Borg founded Allmänna institutet för döfstumma och blinda å Manilla (Public Institute of the Blind and Deaf at Manilla; Manillaskolan). The school had deaf teachers, and the instruction was taught in sign language.

1787 - 1851: Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (USA)

1787 - 1851: Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (USA)

Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet travelled to Europe in 1815 to study methods of education for the deaf.

After several months in Paris, Gallaudet returned to the United States with Laurent Clerc, a deaf teacher. They founded the American school for the deaf in 1817.

1798-1879: Matthew Robert Burns, first Deaf headmaster (UK)

1798-1879: Matthew Robert Burns, first Deaf headmaster (UK)

Matthew Robert Burns (1798-1879) was the first deaf man to become a head teacher of a school for the deaf. 

1799 - 1871: Mathias Stoltenberg (NO)

1799 - 1871: Mathias Stoltenberg (NO)

Mathias Stoltenberg (21 July 1799 – 2 November 1871) was a Norwegian painter. He earned his living mostly as a travelling portrait painter and furniture restorer. His paintings were later rediscovered and presented at the 1914 Jubilee Exhibition in Kristiania.

He lost his sense of hearing as a child, and died in poverty in Vang in 1871.

 

1800 - 1883: Tommaso Pendola (IT)

1800 - 1883: Tommaso Pendola (IT)

Tommaso Pendola (Genoa, June 22, 1800 - Siena, February 12, 1883) was an Italian priest and educator, known above all for his work as an educator of the deaf.

1800: Eartrumpets

1800: Eartrumpets

The first firm to begin commercial production of the ear trumpet was established by Frederick C. Rein in London in 1800.

1803 - 1886:Ferdinand Berthier (FR)

1803 - 1886:Ferdinand Berthier (FR)

Ferdinand Berthier (September 30, 1803 - July 12, 1886) was a deaf educator, intellectual and political organiser in nineteenth-century France, and is one of the earliest champions of deaf identity and culture.

1805: First School for the Deaf in Spain, Madrid (ES)

1805: First School for the Deaf in Spain, Madrid (ES)

The year 1805 marked the opening in Madrid of the Royal School for Deafmutes.

Roberto Francisco Prádez was Spain's first deaf teacher of the deaf and a key figure in deaf education during the early 19th century, It was to his efforts that the Royal School for Deafmutes owed much of its success, and at times during its precarioius first three decades, its very existence.

1806: First School for the Deaf in Russia, Pavlovsk, St. Petersburg

1806: First School for the Deaf in Russia, Pavlovsk, St. Petersburg

"From 1806, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna sponsored educatioal work among deaf children in St. Petersburg. With philanthropic support, the largest school in Russia, the St. Petersburg Institute for the Deaf (Санкт-Петербургское училище глухонемых), emerged there."

1807: First School for the Deaf in Denmark, Copenhagen

1807: First School for the Deaf in Denmark, Copenhagen

"The kg. Danish Institute of Deafness in Copenhagen (kgl. Døvstumme-Institut, 1807-1949) was established by the Fundats of April 17, 1807, at the initiative of Dr. P. A. Castberg. He rented a house in Sølvgade, but when a law of 1817 ordered the teaching of all the deaf children of the country, he had to move to a larger house in Stormgade."

1809: First School for the Deaf in Sweden, Stockholm

1809: First School for the Deaf in Sweden, Stockholm

Sweden's first school for the deaf and blind, Manillaskolan, was founded in 1809.