Deaf Education, 1700 - 1800

1712 - 1789: Abbé Charles Michel de l'Epée  1712 - 1789: Abbé Charles Michel de l'Epée

  • "Abbé Charles Michel de l'Epée of Paris founded the first free school for deaf people in 1755."

    "He first recognized and learned the signs that were already being used by deaf people in Paris and then developed his sign system. He added a signed version of spoken French."

     

     

1715 – 1806: Thomas Braidwood 1715 – 1806: Thomas Braidwood

  • Thomas Braidwood (1715–1806) was a Scottish educator, significant in the history of deaf education. He was the founder of Britain's first school for the deaf.

    Braidwood changed his vocation from teaching hearing pupils to teaching the deaf, and renamed his building Braidwood's Academy for the Deaf and Dumb, the first school of its kind in Britain.

    The educational approach utilized a "combined system" incorporating sign language, articulation, speech, and lip-reading. Braidwood's input into the development and application of a signed language has been credited as one of the most significant influencers of what would become British Sign Language. 

1727 - 1790: Samuel Heinicke (DE) 1727 - 1790: Samuel Heinicke (DE)

  • "Samuel Heinicke was born April 14, 1727, in the part of Europe that is now the eastern part of Germany. In 1754, he began tutoring students—and one of them was deaf. This deaf student reportedly was a young boy. He used the manual alphabet to teach that deaf pupil."

    "In 1777, his reputation as a deaf educator was so well established that he was asked to open the first (oral) public school for the deaf. This school opened in Leipzig, Germany and it was the first school for the deaf officially recognized by a government."

     

1742 - 1822: Abbé Sicard, Teacher of the Deaf (FR) 1742 - 1822: Abbé Sicard, Teacher of the Deaf (FR)

  • Roch-Ambroise Cucurron Sicard (20 September 1742 – 10 May 1822) was a French abbé and instructor of the deaf.

    In 1789, on the death of the Abbé de l'Épée, he succeeded him at a leading school for the deaf which Épée had founded in Paris.

1747 - 1799  : Pierre Desloges 1747 - 1799 : Pierre Desloges

  • In 1779, Piere Desloges wrote what may be the first book published by a deaf person, in which he advocated for the use of sign language in deaf education.

    It was in part a rebuttal of the views of Abbé Claude-François Deschamps de Champloiseau, who had published a book arguing against the use of signs.

    Desloges explained, "like a Frenchman who sees his language belittled by a German who knows only a few French words, I thought I was obliged to defend my language against the false charges of this author." He describes a community of deaf people using a sign language (now referred to as Old French Sign Language).

     

1753 - 1829: Ottavio Assarotti (IT) 1753 - 1829: Ottavio Assarotti (IT)

  • "Ottavio Giovanni Battista Assarotti (25 October 1753 in Genoa – 24 January 1829) was an Italian philanthropist and founder of the first school for deaf people in Genoa, Italy.

1755: First School for the Deaf in France, Abbé Charles Michel de l'Epée 1755: First School for the Deaf in France, Abbé Charles Michel de l'Epée

  • "Abbé Charles Michel de l'Epée of Paris founded the first free school for deaf people in 1755."

     

     

     

1772 - 1836: Roberto Francisco Prádez, first Deaf teacher of the Deaf in Spain 1772 - 1836: Roberto Francisco Prádez, first Deaf teacher of the Deaf in Spain

  • Roberto Prádez was Spain's first deaf teacher of the deaf. Although he has been neglected historically, Prádez is a founding father of deaf education, a heroic figure who contributed crucially to the establishment and operation of Spain's first state-sponsored school.

1772 - 1846: Jean Massieu, First Deaf Teacher of the Deaf in France 1772 - 1846: Jean Massieu, First Deaf Teacher of the Deaf in France

  • Jean Massieu (1772 – July 21, 1846) was a pioneering deaf educator. One of six deaf siblings, he was denied schooling until age thirteen when he met Abbé Sicard, who enrolled him in the Institute national des jeunes sourds de Bordeaux-Gradignan, the Bordeaux School for Deaf Children.

1760: First School for the Deaf in the UK, Edinburgh 1760: First School for the Deaf in the UK, Edinburgh

  • In 1760, Scottish teacher, Thomas Braidwood founded Braidwood Academy for the Deaf and Dumb in Edinburgh. The school's rapid gain of public attention could be credited to Thomas Braidwood's brazen advertising of his methods and his institution.

1778: First School for the Deaf in Germany, Leipzig 1778: First School for the Deaf in Germany, Leipzig

  • In 1778 Samuel Heinicke opened the first German public school for the education of the deaf in Leipzig. 

    Heinicke insisted that lipreading was the best training method because it made his students speak and understand the language as it was used in society.