Deaf Education, 1800 - 1900

1767 - 1828: Jean-Baptiste Pouplin (BE) 1767 - 1828: Jean-Baptiste Pouplin (BE)

  • Jean-Baptiste Pouplin was a Belgian teacher of French origin. He was the founder of one of the first schools for deaf students on the European continent, in Liège in 1819.

1787 - 1851: Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (USA) 1787 - 1851: Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (USA)

  • Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet travelled to Europe in 1815 to study methods of education for the deaf.

    After several months in Paris, Gallaudet returned to the United States with Laurent Clerc, a deaf teacher. They founded the American school for the deaf in 1817.

1800 - 1883: Tommaso Pendola (IT) 1800 - 1883: Tommaso Pendola (IT)

  • Tommaso Pendola (Genoa, June 22, 1800 - Siena, February 12, 1883) was an Italian priest and educator, known above all for his work as an educator of the deaf.

1803 - 1886:Ferdinand Berthier (FR) 1803 - 1886:Ferdinand Berthier (FR)

  • Ferdinand Berthier (September 30, 1803 - July 12, 1886) was a deaf educator, intellectual and political organiser in nineteenth-century France, and is one of the earliest champions of deaf identity and culture.

1805: First School for the Deaf in Spain, Madrid 1805: First School for the Deaf in Spain, Madrid

  • The year 1805 marked the opening in Madrid of the Royal School for Deafmutes.

    Roberto Francisco Prádez was Spain's first deaf teacher of the deaf and a key figure in deaf education during the early 19th century, It was to his efforts that the Royal School for Deafmutes owed much of its success, and at times during its precarioius first three decades, its very existence.

1806: First School for the Deaf in Russia, Pavlovsk, St. Petersburg 1806: First School for the Deaf in Russia, Pavlovsk, St. Petersburg

  • "From 1806, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna sponsored educatioal work among deaf children in St. Petersburg. With philanthropic support, the largest school in Russia, the St. Petersburg Institute for the Deaf (Санкт-Петербургское училище глухонемых), emerged there."

1807: First School for the Deaf in Denmark, Copenhagen 1807: First School for the Deaf in Denmark, Copenhagen

  • "The kg. Danish Institute of Deafness in Copenhagen (kgl. Døvstumme-Institut, 1807-1949) was established by the Fundats of April 17, 1807, at the initiative of Dr. P. A. Castberg. He rented a house in Sølvgade, but when a law of 1817 ordered the teaching of all the deaf children of the country, he had to move to a larger house in Stormgade."

1809: First School for the Deaf in Sweden, Stockholm 1809: First School for the Deaf in Sweden, Stockholm

  • Sweden's first school for the deaf and blind, Manillaskolan, was founded in 1809. 

1810 - 1891: Claudius Forrestier, Deaf Teacher (FR) 1810 - 1891: Claudius Forrestier, Deaf Teacher (FR)

  • Claudius Forestier was the director of the institution des sourds-muets in Lyon from 1852 until 1891 and one of the founders of the Société centrale des sourds-muets in 1838.

1814 - 1865: Václav Frost  (CZ) 1814 - 1865: Václav Frost (CZ)

  • Václav Frostwas born on February 4, 1814 in Nosálov, he died on June 21, 1865 in Konojedy (Litoměřice district), and was buried in Olšany cemeteries in Prague.

    In 1840 he was called as the first teacher to the Prague Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, of which he became director and catechist in 1841. 

1817: First School for the Deaf in Poland 1817: First School for the Deaf in Poland

  • The Institute of the Deaf was established on October 23, 1817 on the initiative of Fr. Jakub Falkowski. Initially, it was located on the premises of the University of Warsaw in the Kazimierzowski Palace, and in the years 1820–1827 in the house of the visiting sisters at Krakowskie Przedmieście.

    On April 26, 1826, the construction of the seat of the Institute at Plac Trzech Krzyży began.

1817: First school for the Deaf in the USA, Hartford 1817: First school for the Deaf in the USA, Hartford

  • Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet met the French educators Abbe Sicard, Laurent Clerc, and Jean Massieu, of the Institut Royal des Sourds-Muets in Paris.

    Impressed with the trio he joined them in Paris and learned as much as he could of the language and their methods. On his return to the United States, he invited deaf instructor Laurent Clerc to join him and, in 1817, they established the first permanent school for deaf children in the States, eventually known as the American School for the Deaf in Hartford, Connecticut.